There are several ways for parents to support their children at home with math concepts being taught in school. Below are some of these ways that do not involve worksheets or the use of a device. 

Third Grade

  • Use grid paper to create congruent shapes.
  • Identify, describe, and classify different household objects as solid figures.
  • Use tangrams to make plane figures.
  • Cut pieces of yarn to make line segments. Measure each segment in inches (to the nearest quarter inch) and centimeters.
  • Go stargazing and make imaginary line segments by connecting the stars (points). Create geometric shapes.
  • Go on a shape hunt! Look for geometric shapes in your home and community. Create a chart to show your findings.
  • Calculate elapsed time by finding out how long it takes to complete daily activities (soccer practice, homework, take a shower, etc.).
  • Measure the perimeter and area of the rooms in your home to determine which rooms are the smallest and largest.
  • Use grid paper to make rectangles with the same perimeters. Determine the area of each rectangle.
  • Fill a small box with blocks (e.g., sugar cubes) to determine its volume. Brainstorm multiple strategies to determine the volume.
  • Go on a fraction hunt! Look for household items that are divided into equal parts (fractions of a whole and fractions of a set). Record the fractions.
  • Roll number cubes to make fractions. Draw pictures of the fractions you make. Place the fractions you’ve made in order on a number line

Fourth Grade

  • Make up numbers, roll numbers with dice, or find numbers (on labels) and compare them.
  • Find numbers and write them in expanded form.
  • Make numbers and tell which place value (and/or value) each digit represents.
  • Place large numbers on a number line.
  • Make arrays out of household items (e.g., pennies, beans, blocks).
  • Select multiplication or division facts to illustrate or write a word problem.
  • Hunt for multiple sets of objects in the home. Use repeated addition and multiplication to find the totals.
  • Use measurement tools when baking or cooking.
  • Compare items by length or weight.
  • Practice scheduling events to determine elapsed time.
  • Use string to measure your wrist, neck, and waist.  Then make comparisons.
  • Read an analog clock throughout the day.
  • Use a stopwatch to keep track on how much T.V is watched throughout the week and how much time is spent on homework, and compare the two amounts of time.
  • Take an object and estimate the weight.  Then use a scale to determine the exact weight, and compare the two amounts.
  • Name two-dimensional figures and find examples at home.
  • Identify, describe, and classify different household objects as two-dimensional figures.
  • Identify real world angles as acute, right, or obtuse.
  • Draw shapes. Identify their angles as obtuse, acute, and right angles.
  • Draw pictures with intersecting lines, perpendicular lines, and parallel lines.
  • Use tangrams to make two-dimensional figures.
  • Create an original repeating pattern of shapes using household objects. 
  • Observe number sequences in the environment (i.e., house addresses, library shelves).
  • Involve the child in event planning to observe quantities of food items (i.e., packages of hot dogs needed to serve the guests).
  • Identify patterns in calendars.

Fifth Grade

  • Create number cubes or spinners and have the student identify the place value and value of different digits in that number.
  • Roll or pick numbers to create decimals. Add, subtract, multiply, or divide the decimals.
  • Find the batting averages or other statistics in the sports section of a newspaper and add or subtract the statistics.
  • Estimate and find the sums and differences of items at the store and in restaurants.
  • Create or pick numbers to make fractions. Add, subtract, or simplify the fractions that you find.
  • Find examples of fractions around the house or neighborhood. Add, subtract, multiply, divide or simplify the fractions that you find.
  • Create numbers to use in fractions. Draw these fractions as parts of a whole or set.
  • Use measuring cups when baking or cooking.
  • Create or pick numbers to make fractions. Add, subtract, or simplify the fractions that you find.
  • Find examples of fractions around the house or neighborhood. Add, subtract, multiply, divide or simplify the fractions that you find.
  • Create numbers to use in fractions. Draw these fractions as parts of a whole or set.
  • Use measuring cups when baking or cooking.

Make flash cards of different geometric figures and their properties.

  • Identify different plane and solid figures in your environment.
  • Find the volume of real-world objects in your home.
  • Make nets for different solid figures using graph paper. Compare nets that work to nets that do not fold correctly to make the figures.
  • Name two-dimensional figures and find examples at home.
  • Draw different polygons within a piece of triangle grid paper, or use combinations of triangles to create other polygons.
  • Make flash cards of different geometric figures and their properties.
  • Make up numbers, roll numbers with dice, or find numbers (on labels) and compare them.
  • Create rules (ex. n = 3) and have your student extend the number pattern (3, 6, _ , _).
  • Create a number pattern and have your student write the rule.
  • Create an input/output machine (function table) for a given rule and have the student fill in the missing inputs and outputs.